Baconage Breakfast Casserole

So, who remembers what baconage is?

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Bacon + Sausage = Baconage

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Sweet mother.

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I discovered the existence of baconage last summer while perusing the Link 41 website.  I nearly had a heart attack.  50% bacon and 50% breakfast sausage, all ground together and served up in breakfast links?  Why yes, I think I will.  They don’t usually have baconage at the farmers market on Wednesdays….Philip and I have bought it in their store once before, a much smaller package that become gravy to be served over biscuits.

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Wednesday I got all giddy and excited when I saw baconage on the chalkboard at the Link 41 stall.  Since biscuits and gravy are kind of a “regular” Saturday morning breakfast (read: our go-to breakfast), and we’d already done them with baconage, we decided that we needed to branch out a little bit.  I decided that the baconage needed to become a casserole.  I thought about just subbing baconage in place of sausage in my grandmother’s egg souffle recipe, but that kind of felt like cheating.  I decided that a new casserole needed to be invented.

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Breakfast casserole is pretty much the perfect breakfast dish.  You make it the night before, then the next morning you stick it in the oven.  It’s perfect for a lazy Saturday…no fiddling with pans or waffle irons or dredging stations.  Preheat, bake, done.  I did whip up some biscuits to go with, but that’s pretty much all the kitchen-related work I did.  In fact, I typed a blog post while my casserole was baking.

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Since I had potatoes from Sequatchie Cove Farm, I decided that those needed to be part of my casserole.  I didn’t want to make the casserole with bread like my grandmother’s souffle, nor did I want to shove a bunch of hashbrown patties into a pan like many of the recipes I’ve seen.  Pioneer Woman’s breakfast potatoes made a great base.  Add some buttermilk cheese from Sweetwater Valley farm, eggs (sadly, organic eggs from the grocery store.  I was desperate.), and the beautiful, fragrant baconage (there’s sorghum in it, you know).  I loved how the casserole came out of the oven perfectly browned, looking almost like a pizza.  Gorgeous.  And delicious.

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Baconage Casserole

Serves 4-8
Prep time 30 minutes
Cook time 1 hour
Total time 1 hour, 30 minutes
Allergy Egg, Milk
Meal type Breakfast
Misc Freezable, Pre-preparable

Ingredients

  • 4 small to medium potatoes (baked, cooled, and cut into chunks)
  • 1/2lb Link 41 baconage (or substitute sausage, chopped bacon or ham, or a combination of finely chopped bacon & ham)
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 cup shredded cheese (any variety (I used buttermilk cheese))
  • 1 cup milk
  • 5 Large eggs
  • salt & pepper to taste

Note

The prep time does not include time for baking the potatoes.

Directions

Step 1
Brown the meat in a large skillet (I used a 10" cast iron skillet). Remove to drain on paper towel.
Step 2
Cook onions in the fat from the meat until they begin to soften, then add the potatoes. Cook until browned.
Step 3
Place the potatoes in a 9-inch pie pan and spread out to cover the bottom of the pan. Cover with the cheese, then the meat.
Step 4
Beat the eggs with the milk. Add salt and pepper. Pour the egg mixture over the meat, cheese, and potatoes. Cover with foil and refrigerate overnight.
Step 5
In the morning, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. To avoid thermal shock, remove the casserole from the refrigerator at least 15-20 minutes ahead of time. Bake covered for 15 minutes, then remove the foil and bake for another 40-45 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to sit for 10-15 minutes before serving.

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Comments

    • Sharon Seiber says

      I would love to be able to print this, also. Alas, too many of the recipes I see and want to try, are the same. Just not printable!

      • Chattavore says

        Sharon, I’m working on adding printable recipes. I didn’t have a way to add the printable recipes until last summer. I’ve been working on adding the printables but it gets away from me sometimes! I’ll add the printable recipe this weekend and work on updating my other older recipes.

      • Chattavore says

        Actually, turns out something went wrong with my old recipe plug-in. This recipe used to be printable. Sounds like I have even more work to do than I thought!

  1. Shirley Wylie says

    In the directions it says “To avoid thermal shock, remove the casserole from the oven at least 15-20 minutes ahead of time.” Do you mean “remove from refrigerater” instead?

  2. ann says

    i would love to know why you have to all of a suden print several pages before you can print the receipe….what is going on in this world…such a waste of time and paper plus agrivation…..it seems everyone is doing this now, seems they have to explain everything about who did this years and how they did it, pls advise..tks…love so many receipes but refuse toprint as i said it is a waste of time and paper….

    • Chattavore says

      Ann, food blogging is about telling the story behind the food and why you wanted to post the recipe. However, you don’t have to print the whole story. If you will scroll to the bottom where the recipe is there is a “print recipe” icon. When you click this it will allow you to print the recipe on one page. :)

  3. Missy says

    I would love to know where to buy this amazing meat known as Baconage…I highly doubt there would be anything quite this delicious in the area of Pennsylvania that I live in. This recipe just sounds wonderful.

    • Chattavore says

      Missy, it’s a specialty of a local artisan meat processor and it’s amazing! I plan to work on creating my own version, though…so stay tuned!

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